work from home

Put Your Pants On

Put Your Pants On

...and other practical pointers for those who work from home.

My first experience working from home was nearly ten years ago and it was born out of necessity.  I'd shared a very small office with a colleague and we were constantly butting heads.  It was tough.  I suggested to the boss that the only way we could achieve some sort of harmony in the office was if we each took a couple days to work from home every week.

My apartment was a 10 minute walk from the office and I was determined to make it work.  With a cell phone, desktop computer and internet access, I set out to make the most of a difficult situation.  

Within a few short weeks, my productivity was up, I was less stressed and our team was getting along much better.  

Since I started Fire Starter Brands in 2010, we've been a work-from-home company.  Each of our team members functions with a laptop, wifi, headset and a handful of cloud or web-based tools.

I've learned that working from home is not easy for most people.  It takes a certain level of discipline, focus and support to pull it off. Here are some of the most important lessons I've learned.

Working From Home Is Awesome If You Do It Right | FastCompany

Working From Home Is Awesome If You Do It Right | FastCompany

WANNA WEAR PAJAMAS AND MUNCH ON CEREAL WHILE YOU WORK? THERE ARE SOME PROS AND CONS TO CONSIDER FIRST BEFORE YOU MAKE THAT DREAM A REALITY.

The people want to work from home.

In fact, according to the last census data, the telecommuting workforce increased 80% from 2005 to 2012, even as the total workforce declined. And in the U.K., record numbers of employees work remotely.

The War on Clutter: 8 Ways to Edit Your Workspace and Life

The War on Clutter: 8 Ways to Edit Your Workspace and Life

For the first time in history, owning less stuff is a sign of wealth. A recent article in T Magazinereports that the new rich are embracing “amor vacui,” the love of empty space.

Graham Hill, founder of design websiteLifeEdited, discovered the “luxury of less” long before the world’s affluent embarked on this trend. In 2007, he sold TreeHugger, the environmental website he founded. The windfall from that sale would lead the young tech millionaire to fill his mansion with all the electronics and possessions his heart desired.